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Mount Rainier High School
22450 19th Avenue South Des Moines, WA 98198

Office Hours:

Monday-Friday: 7:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Student Handbook

The high school years are a foundation for your future growth and development. The Mount Rainier staff wants this experience to be successful and productive for you. We encourage each student to know the information presented in this handbook so we can have a school that functions with a high degree of Ram Pride! The student handbook is provided for your organization of material and convenient reference to policies, procedures, expectations and services of Mount Rainier High School.

Student Handbook

MRHS Policies

Policy Philosophy

The Staff at MRHS overwhelmingly supports the idea of academic honesty for two primary reasons.

  • Authentic assessment of student work cannot happen in the absence of authentic student work. If we are to truly help our students improve their skills and opportunities in life we understand that we must help students understand that the underlying reason that teachers assign work for grades is not to produce grades but to measure student growth in any number of areas.  It is imperative that we continue to work as a school to shift student mindsets to this important understanding.
  • In an age where more things are increasingly intangible, where property is less a thing and more an idea, it is imperative that we encourage students to understand how to properly use the ideas of others for their own purposes. Popular culture has unfortunately promoted the notion that the internet is a fee-free bazaar of everything for the taking, requiring little original effort by the end consumer.  To encourage a more thoughtful use of these resources an academic honesty policy is needed.

An academic honesty policy cannot be purely punitive but rather underscore the need for students to do the work.  Our policy reflects this point in that until late in the stages of policy development the student is always required to redo the work and resubmit it for assessment.  There is also a requirement for the student to meet with adults and reflect on their choices (past and future).

To read the Policy in its entirity please click on the link below to view the MRHS Acaemic Honestly Policy.

Academic Honesty Policy

Assessment Policy

Our Mission: Mount Rainier High School promotes the growth of every student and seeks to create principled, knowledgeable, and inquisitive graduates empowered to lead productive and caring lives in a global society.

Our Shared Beliefs:

  • All students will be treated as though they want to and can be successful (with consistency and structure, students will rise to meet high expectations)
  • Everyone learns best in an environment that is intentionally supportive and collaborative, where relationships are as important as content
  • Learning is a process that involves continuous reflection and refinement (where failure is part of growing and learning)
  • All students will have equitable access and opportunity to learn (where they have multiple opportunities and differentiated support as well as quality alternatives at all grade levels; equity can be provided by students, staff, parents and community collaborating together)

Assessment Philosophy:

Mt. Rainier’s assessment philosophy aligns with the Principles of MYP assessment as laid out in the Principles to Practice as well as ties directly to Our Shared Beliefs. These include the following:

  • Criteria is public, known in advance and ensures that assessment is transparent
  • Teachers work together to establish common standards against which they evaluate each students achievement holistically
  • Assessments provide evidence of student understand through authentic performance
  • All MYP criteria are equally weighted
  • Evidence of student learning comes from the performance of the student over the duration of the units taught
  • Assessment strategies are varied and may include: observation, selected responses, open-ended tasks, performance
  • Assessment includes formative and summative and occurs throughout the unit

Assessment Responsibilities of the School:

Highline School District shall:

  • Provide the necessary support to administer all types of required assessments.
  • Adequately fund the IB MYP Programme in order to implement it with integrity and with open-access to all students. This would include provisions for classroom materials, teacher training, and systemic understanding of the IB MYP Programme by District personnel in leadership positions with oversight of the IB MYP Programme.

The administration of Mount Rainier High School shall:

  • Require that teachers regularly update classroom grades in accepted online grading platforms.
  • Recognize and support the implementation of the IB MYP Programme through master scheduling

Mount Rainier staff shall:

  • Administer a range of appropriate assessments (formative and summative) on a regular basis in order to adequately inform students and families of academic growth as well as to inform instructional choices based on student learning growth.
  • Strive to allow students multiple assessment opportunities to demonstrate mastery of skill and content.
  • Ensure that students have adequate practice prior to sitting for major summative assessments.
  • Update student grades in the most current district adopted information system in a regular and timely fashion in order to keep students and parents aware of academic growth.
  • Use feedback from IBO assessments and other assessments (classroom, school district, and state level) to continuously improve instructional practices.
  • Provide students will rubrics prior to administering the summative assessment.

Mount Rainier students shall:

  • Use rubrics provided by the teacher and IBO to complete their assignments with integrity and honesty.
  • Use rubrics provided by the teacher and IBO to reflect upon a plan of self-improvement, working with teachers to meet standards.
  • Diligently apply themselves to self-improvement while at MRHS through regular attendance and meaningful participation in classes.
  • Recognize the need for and work to develop self-advocacy skills in order to meet their own short and long term goals.

Mount Rainier parents/guardians shall:

  • Seek to understand the demands of their student’s coursework.
  • Use school provided resources to inform their student’s choice of academic program.
  • Take an active role in understanding how their student’s learning growth is measured and take a vested interest in supporting the out-of-classroom demands for learning (homework, field experiences, special projects)
  • Support their student by arranging their family schedule to allow for student attendance at school, school related activities, and required school or IB Programme assessments (previously outlined).

MYP Assessments and Criteria

All MYP subject areas will use the MYP Subject Group Criterion along with the Assessment Criteria using the 8 point scale.

Criteria:

Each of the criteria is further broken down into sub-stands of that particular objective. Each strand must be taught and assessed a minimum of two times a year. Gradebooks in Illuminate are set up based up the four Criterion per subject area.

Each criterion is divided into various achievement levels (numerical values) that appear in bands, and each band contains general, qualitative value statements called level descriptors. The levels 1 and 2 appear as the first band, levels 3 and 4 as the second band, and so on. Level 0 is available for work that is not described by the band descriptor for levels 1 and 2. All criteria have four bands and a maximum of eight achievement levels. All MYP subject groups have four assessment criteria divided into four bands, each of which represents two achievement levels. MYP criteria are equally weighted. The level descriptors for each band describe a range of student performance in the various strands of each objective. At the lowest levels, student achievement in each of the strands will be minimal. As the numerical levels increase, the level descriptors describe greater achievement levels in each of the strands.

Subject Group

Criterion A

Criterion B

Criterion C

Criterion D

Language and Literature

Analyzing

Organizing

Producing Text

Using Language

Individuals and Societies

Knowing and Understanding

Investigating

Communicating

Thinking Critically

Science

Knowing and Understanding

Inquiring and Design

Processing and Evaluation

Reflecting on the Impacts of Science

Math

Knowing and Understanding

Investigating Patterns

Communicating

Applying Math in Real-World Contexts

Language Acquisition

Comprehending Spoken and Visual Text

Comprehending Written and Visual Text

Communicating

Using Language

PE

Knowing and Understanding

Planning for Performance

Applying and Performing

Reflecting and Improving Performance

Arts

Knowing and Understanding

Developing Skills

Creating the Solution

Responding

Personal Projects

Investigating

Planning

Taking Action

Reflecting

9th and 10th grade Teaming:

9th and 10th grade teachers are divided into different houses who all share the same students. On each team is a teacher from Language and Literature, Individuals and Societies, and Science. Teachers who share students in 9th grade and grade level subject in 10th grade have common planning which allows them to collaborate on building assessments and standardizing their evaluation of assessments. Time is given throughout the year for 9th and 10th grade houses to meet and ensure the success of students who teachers share throughout the day.

Reassessment

All 9/10 teachers offer reassessment to students. Common wording for core content teachers on syllabi is as follows: Because I value the process of learning, students will have the chance to reassess their work on summative assessments. Students can re-assess work for a higher score without penalty, but need to follow the reassessment procedure (on form) within 2-3 weeks of receiving a scored summative assessment. No re-assessments will be accepted during the last week of each grading period. Grade changes are made at the teacher’s discretion.

Elective teachers all offer reassessment as well but because of the nature of the content each policy looks unique to their discipline.

Instructional Leadership Team:

This team was created by the principal starting in 2015- 16 and is comprised of 5 teachers and the principal. The team meets every other Monday and is working on implementing Standards Based Instruction and Grading at Mt. Rainier. The team attended a 2 day Standards Based Grading Conference in the winter of 2015 and is currently working towards scaffolding the implementation of a Standards Based Mindset with staff. As of the 2016-17 school year, this team is now comprised of all department heads and meet monthly to move instructional practices forward.

Reporting to Parents

Mt. Rainier values communication with parents and see it as a key role in student success. We have many ways in which parents can be informed of student’s progress and parents are always encouraged to meet with teachers.

Progress Reports

Progress reports are mailed home at mid – quarter. Any students who has a D or an F will receive a progress report and comments indicating why. Parents are encouraged to work with teachers in order to help students earn credit for courses. At the end of quarter 1 and 3, grades are sent out. These serve as progress reports as well. At the end of quarter 2 and 4 grades are posted on the student’s transcript.

Student Led Conferences

Student Led Conferences are held twice a year in November and in April. The dates are chosen by the staff and coincide with grading periods that will still allow for students to show progress towards standards. Student Led Conferences are run through the student’s advisory and times are designated so that parents are able to meet with individual content teachers. Student Led Conferences have students reflect on their academics, college and career plans as well as the IB Learner Profile.

Illuminate

Illuminate is the grading program used by Highline School District. Students and parents have access to grades via Illuminate. Teachers are required to update grades every two weeks. Starting this year, all 9th and 10thgrade teachers have implemented a standards based gradebook using the MYP Assessment Criteria and all teachers use the 8 point MYP scale to assess work.  Because this is a new system of grading, a handout was created so that parents are able to understand the new system. See attached page.

Honors

For the 2016-17 school year classes at Mt. Rainier will not be tracked Honors and Standards. We will be offering an Honors designation for students who earn an A or B in Language Arts, Individuals and Societies and Science. This will be revisited at the end of the 2016-17 school year.

IP grades

In alignment with our shared belief that learning is a process Mt. Rainier teachers may offer a grade of In Progress “IP” to students who may require more time to show proficiency on the MYP Assessment Criteria. Students who receive an IP are allowed 5 weeks after the end of the semester to submit the necessary work to show proficiency and earn credit for the course.

MYP E-Assessment

Mt. Rainier will make full testing for the MYP certificate available to all who qualify to test. At a minimum we hope to dipstick 2 subjects per year in order to develop a sense of where our students are performing and what our areas of growth are.

Personal Project

We believe that all of our 10th graders are capable of completing a Personal Project. We will make resources available to our staff and 10th grade students so they may be successful. As well, we will involve our parents and the community so they are aware of the expectations on students.

Special Education Policy

Our Shared Beliefs:

  • All students will be treated as though they want to and can be successful (with consistency and structure, students will rise to meet high expectations)
  • Everyone learns best in an environment that is intentionally supportive and collaborative, where relationships are as important as content
  • Learning is a process that involves continuous reflection and refinement (where failure is part of growing and learning)
  • All students will have equitable access and opportunity to learn (where they have multiple opportunities and differentiated support as well as quality alternatives at all grade levels; equity can be provided by students, staff, parents and community collaborating together)

Mount Rainier is a full service public high school. Part of the educational service we provide includes educational programming for special needs students. Our staff delivers support in many ways including offering after school tutoring, providing learning strategy supports to students, as well as assisting families with access to mental health services. Upon enrollment, students requesting SpEd services or students who have previously been identified in school records as needing special services are evaluated by trained specialists to best determine what supports would be appropriate and with the consultation of the family a plan of support is developed for each student.

Like IBO, MRHS believes that all students should have equitable access to the fullest range of educational opportunities. As possible and appropriate, MRHS students receiving special education supports are included in general education classes. For students who need extra support in Math or Language Arts, they are enrolled in support classes.

MRHS Services Provided:

504 Accommodations – Stemming from the US Federal Policy Americans with Disabilities Act, any students diagnosed with mental and/or physical health-related conditions that affect learning and/or life activities are eligible for educational plans that accommodate their individual needs. 504 eligible students have plans developed by school staff in conjunction with families. The accommodations within these plans are the responsibility of each teacher to oversee and administer. In our attendance and grading system, Illuminate, students who receive accommodations under a 504 have a “504” next to their name to notify teachers.

Individual Education Plans (IEP): Students who qualify for special education services receive an IEP developed and monitored by a partnership between the parents and the school based special education staff. In our attendance and grading system, Illuminate, students who have an IEP have “SPED” their name to notify teachers. Teachers are included in the IEP meetings and have access to the IEP. Students with IEPs receive additional supports within one of the following school-based programs:

  • Independent Living Classroom: guided instruction in basic facets of daily life.
  • Learning Resource Classroom: Learning supports in reading, writing, and math. Students in this inclusion model spend 1-2 periods in a special education setting and the rest of their day in general education classes.
  • Emotional Behavior Center: Students spend 1-2 periods in general education classes and re remainder of their day is in a highly personalized small setting to support their other educational needs.
  • Intensive Academic Center: students have communication obstacles and little to no self-advocacy skills. Students are provided intensive individualized support but are in general education setting 1-2 periods a day.

MRHS has para-professional educators in several of the special education classes to offer additional support. As well, our certified teachers have a field hour each day to be available to identified student in the general education classes who may need extra support.

Highly Capable: Students coming to MRHS from the district’s Hi-Cap program will be enrolled in Biology in lieu of 9th grade Integrated Science for the 2016-17 school year. They, along with all students in 9/10, will be able to earn an Honors Designation by earning an A or B on Language Arts, Science, and/or Social Studies for the 2016-17 school year.

IB In-District Transfer Students: Students who come to MRHS on the IB transfer with the intention of participating in the MYP and DP and who have either a 504 or an IEP will pursue a course of study which provides the student with academic rigor pursuant to their learning disability. A student’s participation in the IB DP program will be determined by the IEP team.

Highline School District:

Highline Public Schools recognizes that some students require specialized instruction and/or services to achieve success in school. In order to provide appropriate educational opportunities designed to meet each student's unique learning needs, Highline has a continuum of special program options.

The school district provides services to identify and evaluate potential disabilities in children ages birth to 21 living within Highline's boundaries. We offer screening clinics that provide parents with information about their child's academic, vision, hearing, language, cognitive, and motor skill development.

Special Education staff are committed to helping you identify the services your child may need. If you have concerns about your child's development please contact the Special Education staff at 206.631.3009

For more information: https://www.highlineschools.org/Domain/105

Language Policy

Our Shared Beliefs:

  • All students will be treated as though they want to and can be successful (with consistency and structure, students will rise to meet high expectations)
  • Everyone learns best in an environment that is intentionally supportive and collaborative, where relationships are as important as content
  • Learning is a process that involves continuous reflection and refinement. (where failure is part of growing and learning)
  • All students will have equitable access and opportunity to learn (where they have multiple opportunities and differentiated support as well as quality alternatives at all grade levels; equity can be provided by students, staff, parents and community collaborating together)

 Philosophy: At Mt. Rainier High School we believe it is our duty to provide an inclusive, equitable environment that strives to support, value, and develop the cultural and linguistic identities of all students and staff. We recognize linguistic backgrounds as a rich resource from which students can draw from, not a deficit that holds them back from success. Each teacher at Mt. Rainier High School is an equipped in the literacy skills it takes to be successful in their content; therefore each teacher is a teacher of language. We recognize that students’ learning in both Language A and Language B is a lifelong process, and in order to reach maximum potential instruction needs to be diverse and responsive to student needs.

Demographics: MRHS has 1638 students (10/15). Our demographics include the following:

Hispanic/Latino 427 26.1%

American Indian/Alaskan Native 11 0.7%

Asian 223 13.6%

Black/African American 191 11.7%

Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander 58 3.5%

White 603 36.8%

Two or More Races 125 7.6%

Language A: The primary language spoken at MRHS is English. All courses, with the exception of World Languages, are taught in English. Language instruction is driven by the MYP Objectives and the Common Core State Standards.

 Language B: MRHS offers Spanish, French, Spanish for Spanish Speakers and Arabic. Students have the opportunity to take a World Language in the Diploma Program in their 11/12 grade years. Students who come to MRHS fluent in other languages may test for up to four credits in their mother tongue language.

ELL and Mother Tongue Support: We have a full time ELL Facilitator who works with our ELL department, classroom teachers and support staff to ensure our ELL students are receiving the supports they need. At MRHS we are committed to an Inclusion Model where all our students have equitable access to content classes taught by highly qualified teachers. Teachers encourage students to utilize their mother tongue in class in order to process information on a deeper level and deliver a higher quality product with Translanguaging strategies. Staff members received summer professional development, as well as ongoing support, surrounding vocabulary acquisition, community building, mother tongue maintenance, and reading techniques to better equip staff with the tools to make the language of their content comprehensible.

Communication with non-English Speaking Parents: We believe our parents are our strongest resource and want to support their children with their education. We have a full time Spanish speaking Para-Professional who is in classes helping students gain a deep understanding of the objectives and activities. Additionally, we have a full time Spanish-speaking Family Liaison who assists families in navigating the public school landscape who do not speak English as their primary language. We also provide translated materials, currently in Spanish, and provide interpreters for daily communication as well as for Student Led Conferences (multiple languages are available).

Resources and Supports:

  • Highline School district’s Philosophy is aligned with ours. See attached.
  • District Level support includes both GLAD strategies and World Language support personnel who work closely with MRHS
  • We provide an after school program for 9/10th grade students to receive help with class work in Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, and Math.
  • Read Right Program provides support for students who are struggling readers.

Beginner- Students enrolled in Beginner classes currently receive three class hours of English Language Development. Two hours are in a Read/Write block where students develop their reading and writing skills. Leveled texts, Myon, Rosetta Stone, and differentiated tasks are strategies/software used in this block to aid student learning. The third hour is an English Language Development support class where students focus on skills surrounding advocacy, speaking, listening, and being a student in the United States. These three hours are intended to be immersive, instructive, and inclusionary. Students are encouraged to use their mother tongue frequently to process new information and tasks while beginning to utilize English. Additionally, many of the beginners take a Multilingual Algebra class where students’ linguistic diversity matches the diversity of the school’s population. Beginners have the opportunity to take Spanish for Spanish speakers if their Language A is Spanish. 

While most students exit beginner classes in a year it is completely normal for students in beginner classes to stay for more than one year due to factors like previous schooling and literacy levels in their mother tongue. Students in beginner classes may be moved to intermediate based on student request, teacher recommendation (supported by student work), and the ELPA21 exam.

Students in Beginner classes are typically broken into two categories: Newcomers (level 1) and High Beginners (level 2). According to the Washington State English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPs) a students in level 1 will be able to:

  1. Use a very limited set of strategies to identify a few key words and phrases in oral communications and simple oral and written texts.
  2. Participate in short conversational and written exchanges on familiar topics and respond to yes/no questions and some wh-questions.
  3. With support of modeled sentences, communicate information about familiar texts, topics, and experiences.
  4. Express an opinion about a familiar topic.
  5. Gather information from provided sources and label collected information, experiences, or events.
  6. Identify a point an author or a speaker makes.
  7. Recognize the meaning of some words learned through conversations, reading and being read to.
  8. Recognize the meaning of a few frequently occurring words, simple phrases, and formulaic expressions in texts about familiar topics, experiences, or events by relying heavily on context, visual aids, and knowledge of morphology in their “heart” language.
  9. Communicate basic information about an event or topic and use a narrow range of vocabulary and syntactically simple sentences with support from context, visual aids, and non-verbal communication.
  10. Recognize and use a small number of frequently occurring nouns, noun phrases, verbs, conjunctions, and prepositions. Also, understand and respond to simple questions with support such as sentence frames.

According to the Washington State English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPs) a students in level 2 will be able to:

  1. Use an emerging set of strategies to identify the main topic and retell a few key details in oral presentation and simple oral and written texts.
  2. Participate in short conversational and written exchanges on familiar topics and texts, present information and ideas, and respond to simple questions and wh-questions.
  3. Deliver short oral presentations and compose written narratives or informational texts about familiar texts, topics, experiences, or events with support such as modeling and sentence frames.
  4. Construct a claim about familiar topics, introduce the topic; give a reason to support the claim; and provide a concluding statement.
  5. Gather information from digital and print sources and summarize data and information.
  6. Identify the main argument an author or speaker makes and identify one reason an author or a speaker gives to support the argument.
  7. Adapt language choices to task and audience with emerging control and use some frequently occurring general academic, and content-specific, words in conversation and discussion.
  8. Determine the meaning of frequently occurring words, phrases, and expressions in texts about familiar topics, experiences, or events while using context clues, visual aids, reference materials, and knowledge of structures in their “heart” language.
  9. Recount a short sequence of events in order, introduce an informational topic, provide one or two faces about the topic, and use common linking words to connect events and ideas with the support such as modeling and sentence frames.
  10. Use frequently occurring verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions and produce simple and compound sentences with support.

 Intermediate- Students enrolled in the Intermediate level currently receive one Cotaught ELA class and a Language Essentials class. The ELA class is taught by two highly qualified teachers, an English Language Arts teacher and an English Language Learning teacher. The content, standards, and objectives are the same as other classes, but modified with additional scaffolds. The Language Essentials class is taught by the ELL teacher who is in the ELA class. Its intention is to provide students with additional time to practice the academic vocabulary and language functions necessary for students to be successful in their other classes. Similar to the beginner classes, the experiences in the intermediate level are intended to be supportive, stimulating, structured, and sequenced. Students are still encouraged to develop their mother tongue through processes like sharing ideas, intentional grouping, and reading in their mother tongue whenever possible. These students are in grade level classes and electives.

 While most students stay in intermediate for more than a year it is completely normal for student in intermediate classes to exit in less than a year due to factors like previous schooling and literacy levels in their mother tongue. Students in intermediate classes may be moved to advanced classes based on student request, teacher recommendation (supported by student work), and the ELPA21 exam.

 According to the Washington State English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPs) a students in level 3 will be able to:

  1. Determine the central idea or theme in oral presentations and written texts, explain how the theme is developed by specific details in the texts, and summarize part of the text.
  2. Participate in conversations, discussions, and written exchanges on familiar topics, texts, and issues; build on the ideas of others; express her or his own ideas; ask and answer relevant question; add relevant information and evidence; and restate some of the key ideas expressed.
  3. Deliver short oral presentations; compose written informational texts; and develop the topic with a few details about familiar texts, topics, or events.
  4. Construct a claim about familiar topics; introduce the topic; provide sufficient reasons of facts to support the claim; and provide a concluding statement.
  5. Carry out short research projects to answer a question; gather information from multiple sources; evaluate the reliability of each source; paraphrase key information in a short written or oral report; include illustrations, diagrams and other graphics; and provide a list of sources.
  6. Explain the reasons an author or a speaker gives to support a claim and cite textual evidence to support the analysis.
  7. Adapt language choices and style according to purpose, task and audience; use an increasing number of general academic and content-specific words and expressions in speech and written text; and show developing control of style and tone in oral or written text.
  8. Determine the meaning of general academic and content-specific words and phrases and frequently occurring expressions in texts about familiar topics, experiences, or events by using context, some visual aids, reference materials, and a developing knowledge of English morphology.
  9. Recount a sequence of events with a beginning, middle, and end; introduce and develop an informational topic with facts and details; use common transitional words and phrases to connect events, ideas, and opinions, and provide a conclusion.
  10. Use simple phrases; use simple clauses; and produce and expand simple, compound and a few complex sentences.

Advanced- Students enrolled in the Advanced level currently receive one Cotaught ELA class and a Language Essentials class. The ELA class is taught by two highly qualified teachers, an English Language Arts teacher and an English Language Learning teacher. The content, standards, and objectives are the same as other classes, but modified with additional scaffolds. The Language Essentials class is taught by the ELL teacher who is in the ELA class. Its intention is to provide students with additional time to practice the academic vocabulary and language functions necessary for students to be successful in their other classes. Students enrolled in Advanced are expected to need less scaffolds during instruction time as well as produce work that is advancing towards comparability with their peers who have English as their Language A. Typically students enrolled in the Advanced level are in all General Education courses with their grade level peers with some minor exceptions.

A major misconception with students enrolled in Advanced is that they have been in the United States school system for many years, however, it is common for newly arrived immigrants to be placed in advanced depending on prior schooling and literacy levels in their mother tongue. Students in advanced classes may exit the ELL program based on scoring a ‘4’ or ‘5’ on the ELPA21 exam, teacher recommendation (supported by student work), and or student request/family request.

According to the Washington State English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPs) a students in level 4 will be able to:

  1. Determine two central ideas or themes in oral presentations and written texts; analyze the development of the themes/ideas; cite specific details and evidence from the texts to support the analysis; and summarize a simple text.
  2. Participate in conversations discussions, and written exchanges on a range of topics texts, and issues; build on the ideas of others; express her or his own ideas clearly; support points with specific and relevant evidence; ask and answer questions to clarify ideas and conclusions; and summarize the key points expressed.
  3. Deliver oral presentations; compose written informational texts; develop the topic with some relevant details, concepts, examples, and information; and integrate grap Language Policy Mt. Rainier High School
    Our Shared Beliefs: 
    All students will be treated as though they want to and can be successful.
    (with consistency and structure, students will rise to meet high expectations)